Tag Archives: osteoarthritis

Statins Osteoarthritis

Stopping Osteoarthritis with Statins?

Recent research shows that statins — the drugs people take to lower their cholesterol — may also lower their chances of getting osteoarthritis or delay its progression.

Traditionally, treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) has been limited to relieving symptoms and replacing joints with prostheses once they become irreparably damaged. However, researchers are actively looking for treatments that will not only ease OA’s pain and stiffness, but will slow, stop – or even prevent – the progression of joint damage. Statins may be one possible answer.

Proof That Statins May Work Against OA 

Several studies have found that all other things being equal (age, weight, comorbid conditions, for example) people taking statins either had a lower prevalence of OA or had slower-progressing OA than those who didn’t take the drugs.
Continue reading Stopping Osteoarthritis with Statins?

Osteoarthritis Vitamin D

Vitamin D May Slow Osteoarthritis Progression

Can Vitamin D help prevent the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) or slow joint damage if you already have OA? While study results have been mixed, in general, they suggest that Vitamin D may be protective in OA.

Vitamin D promotes calcium absorption by the body to enable bone growth and repair. Because osteoarthritis has a bone growth component, researchers have been examining the potential role of vitamin D in osteoarthritis development and progression.

What the Studies Show

Two studies published in 2014 looked at vitamin D levels in the blood of people with or at risk of OA. A study published in The Journal of Nutrition found that participants with low vitamin D levels had a more than 2-fold elevated risk of knee OA progression compared with those with greater vitamin D concentrations. The other, published in Annals of Rheumatic Diseases, found that among older adults, moderate vitamin D deficiency predicted new or worsening knee pain over 5 years.

Continue reading Vitamin D May Slow Osteoarthritis Progression

boxtox osteoarthritis

Studies Suggest Botox May Ease Osteoarthritis Pain

Widely used by doctors to soften forehead wrinkles and reduce uncontrollably sweaty armpits, researchers are exploring botulinum toxin as a potential therapy for osteoarthritis (OA) pain.

“The Botox story is very intriguing,” says David Felson, MD, MPH, professor of medicine and epidemiology at Boston University School of Medicine. “It isn’t just muscles. It can paralyze nerves. Just like celebrities injecting it into wrinkles, it could have the same effect on a hip muscle. Botox could paralyze the muscle that is transmitting pain.”

This toxin may eventually be used to treat OA patients whose pain is not sufficiently controlled by traditional medicines like NSAIDs or analgesics, and for patients who may experience adverse effects from those medicines, says Dr. Felson.

Continue reading Studies Suggest Botox May Ease Osteoarthritis Pain

Texting and Osteoarthritis

Can Lifestyle Factors Influence Osteoarthritis Outcomes?

Can cracking your knuckles cause cartilage breakdown?  Can texting trigger hand OA?  Will wearing high heels damage your knee joints? Osteoarthritis (OA), sometimes called “wear and tear” arthritis, occurs when the cartilage or cushion between joints breaks down leading to pain, stiffness and swelling. So it’s often thought that if you engage in repetitive activity and put added stress on your joints, it can affect how quickly you get OA or how fast it progresses. Can these five lifestyle factors – knuckle cracking, texting, diet, high-impact exercise and high-heeled shoes – affect your joint health and possibly cause osteoarthritis? Here’s what research says.

Continue reading Can Lifestyle Factors Influence Osteoarthritis Outcomes?