arthritis foundation planned giving

Arthritis Foundation Donors Like You Fuel Our Mission

Every day at the Arthritis Foundation, we fight this disease on all fronts – raising awareness, providing life-changing resources, holding community events and offering other local support – all while funding research that shows promise, not only for earlier diagnostics and innovative treatments, but also, ultimately, a cure.

Please take a moment to watch the informative video below to see how our mission is driven forward by the generosity of people like you.

Continue reading Arthritis Foundation Donors Like You Fuel Our Mission

carra grants 2018

Spring 2018 Childhood Research Grants Announced

We recently gave approximately $160,000 toward childhood arthritis research in the form of research grants. The grants are funded through the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA); small grants were given to pediatric rheumatologists and fellows small grant research awards were given to third year fellowship students.

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cvs and arthritis foundation LGGA partnership

Help the World Get a Grip on Arthritis During Arthritis Awareness Month

May is National Arthritis Awareness Month, and we’re asking you to join us in our fight against the world’s most prevalent disease.

Arthritis is the number one cause of disability in the United States, affecting one in every four adults, nearly 300,000 children and countless families and loved ones. The physical pain it causes can make everyday tasks difficult if not impossible. Perhaps worst of all, arthritis steals quality of life, preventing people from doing the things they love, like favorite hobbies or activities and even simple pleasures like picking up their child.

That’s why we’ve launched our Let’s Get a Grip on Arthritis campaign. CVS Health®, the campaign’s Presenting Partner, is working with us to help Americans get a grip on arthritis. Shop at CVS Pharmacy® before May 31 and they’ll donate $1 back to the Arthritis Foundation with the purchase of select products, up to a maximum of $300,000.

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celebrex safety label

FDA Advisory Panel Recommends Softening “Celebrex” Safety Labeling

A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel concluded that prescription pain medication celecoxib (Celebrex), marketed by Pfizer, is as safe as other common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) when it comes to cardiovascular (CV) risks. The panel recommended updating the medicine’s safety labeling to reflect that.

Celecoxib is a selective COX-2 inhibitor, which means it blocks production of an enzyme associated with inflammation. “Nonselective” NSAIDs, such as naproxen and ibuprofen, block both COX-1 and COX-2; by blocking COX-1, they give rise to gastrointestinal (GI) side effects. Celecoxib is often prescribed to patients with osteoarthritis (OA) or an inflammatory type of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), especially those who are at higher risk of GI side effects.

But its cardiovascular safety profile has been under a cloud of suspicion for more than a decade, after two other COX-2 inhibitors were pulled from the U.S. market. Rofecoxib (Vioxx) was removed in 2004 and valdecoxib (Bextra) in 2005 over concerns they raised the risk of cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, to unacceptable levels. (All NSAIDs increase the risk of cardiovascular side effects; risks rise with the dose and length of time used.)

Continue reading FDA Advisory Panel Recommends Softening “Celebrex” Safety Labeling

let's get a grip on arthritis

Let’s Get a Grip on Arthritis

So More People Can Do What They Love

If you have arthritis, you know full well what it’s like. The physical pain that makes everyday tasks difficult if not impossible. The emotional distress and feelings of isolation. The money it drains from your family budget.

But many of those who don’t have arthritis don’t have a clue. They don’t know that:

  • Arthritis is the world’s most prevalent disease. In the United States alone, 54 million adults – one in four – have doctor-diagnosed arthritis. And as many as 91 million Americans may truly be affected, according to a recent study.
  • Arthritis isn’t just an “elderly disease.” Two-thirds of people with arthritis are under the age of 65, including 300,000 children.
  • While it may not be as life-threatening as cancer or heart disease, arthritis accounts for 100 million doctor visits and nearly 7 million hospitalizations each year. It can damage vital organs and make other conditions worse.
  • Arthritis is to blame for the loss of 172 million workdays each year and costs the U.S. economy more than $300 billion annually in lost wages and medical expenses.

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when the time comes - preparedness

Practical Advice for a Difficult Time

One of the most challenging times in life is dealing with the loss of a spouse or partner.  You must not only deal with the sorrow and grief of your loss, but also attend to many details and decisions that need to be made. The Arthritis Foundation has a resource guide called When the Time Comes (WTTC) to help both prior to and during this difficult time. Continue reading Practical Advice for a Difficult Time

joint surgery procedures future

Outlook for Joint Replacements

Fewer people may get joint replacement procedures in the future than previously thought. That’s according to research presented recently at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) in New Orleans. Lead author Matthew Sloan, MD, an orthopedic surgery resident at the University of Pennsylvania, says the number of procedures will continue to rise but at a slower rate.

Knee and hip replacements have been the standard treatment for end-stage arthritis for more than 40 years. During that time, the rate of surgeries has skyrocketed, more than doubling between 2000 and 2008 alone. There has also been an increase in so-called “revision surgeries” – do-over procedures to replace a failed or worn-out implant after the initial surgery.

Continue reading Outlook for Joint Replacements

national doctors day

Happy National Doctor’s Day!

Thank your doctor today – it’s National Doctor’s Day!

The first Doctors’ Day observance occurred in 1933 in Winder, Georgia, where Eudora Brown Almond, the wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond proposed setting aside a day for mailing greeting cards and placing flowers on the graves of deceased doctors. In 1958, the U.S. House of Representatives adopted a resolution commemorating Doctors’ Day. And in 1990, following overwhelming approval by Congress, President George H.W. Bush turned the commemoration into a national holiday.

National Doctor’s Day is a day we celebrate “the contribution of physicians who serve our country by caring for its citizens.”

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arthritis united 2018

Highlights from the 2018 Arthritis United Conference

Last week, the 2018 Arthritis United Conference took place over a long weekend in Washington, D.C., bringing together approximately 200 attendees from across the country and globe through a virtual, live-streamed experience to learn, connect and grow together.

The weekend featured notable keynote speakers, medical experts, educational breakout sessions and volunteer-led panels covering a variety of topics for adults living with arthritis and related rheumatic conditions as well as loved ones. For the first time, seven selected sessions were also live-streamed through an online, interactive forum for those that were not able to attend in person.

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opiod alternatives for arthritis pain

Two Studies Highlight Opioid Alternatives

The United States has been grappling with a growing opioid epidemic that is forcing doctors, policymakers and patients to come up with alternative ways to manage both chronic and acute pain and reduce the amount of opioid prescribing in the country. A pair of studies presented recently at the 2018 meeting of the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) in New Orleans examine two possibilities for patients undergoing surgery.

The first study found that counseling before surgery significantly cuts the number of opioids patients take after hand surgery. And the second study, led by the same doctor, showed that ibuprofen and acetaminophen each treats postsurgical pain from hand surgery as well as oxycodone.

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