Category Archives: Treatment

Arthritis Research Dr Lefebvre

Researchers on the Path to a Cure – Spotlight on Dr. Veronique Lefebvre

What do skin and cartilage have in common? It depends on who you ask. Dr. Veronique Lefebvre, a researcher at Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, is currently working on a 2016 foundation-funded project called “Quality-by-Design approach to create articular cartilage from pluripotency” that connects the dots between skin and cartilage. Dr. Lefebvre and her team are developing a protocol that starts with skin cells and ends with knee cartilage.
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Ankylosing Spondylitis Side Effects Risk Factors

Women and Long-Standing Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients at Risk for Other Conditions

Women who have ankylosing spondylitis and men and women who have had the disease longer have an increased risk of developing potentially debilitating symptoms beyond the joints, according to a new study presented at the American College of Rheumatology’s Annual Meeting.
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heart attack stroke risk celebrex nsaids

Celecoxib: Not So Hard on the Heart?

The recent findings of a huge study may erase some concerns about a pain reliever that has long been saddled with a worrisome reputation: celecoxib (Celebrex). While all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) carry a warning that users have an increased risk for heart attacks and strokes, celecoxib is closely linked to two similar drugs that were taken off the market due to concerns about their cardiovascular safety. However, the new research suggests that celecoxib may not be more dangerous than other NSAIDs, and might even be safer in some important ways. Continue reading Celecoxib: Not So Hard on the Heart?

Arthritis Pain management Toolkit

Announcing the New Breaking the Arthritis Pain Chain Toolkit

When you think of arthritis one of the first things that comes to mind is pain. Pain can be all consuming; whether it’s burning, aching, or stiffness it’s not only an annoyance, it can affect every aspect of your life. You shouldn’t have to just “live” with the pain either. It is possible to manage your pain and improve your quality of life.
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Arthritis Biosimilar for Humira

FDA Approves Third Biosimilar for Arthritis – Amjevita, a Biosimilar to Humira

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Friday approved the third biosimilar to treat inflammatory types of arthritis – but, like the two that were previously approved, this one will not be available to patients until patent disputes are resolved.
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Biosimilar For Arthritis Approved

FDA Approves Second Arthritis Biosimilar – Biosimilar Version of Drug Enbrel

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved etanercept-szzs (brand name: Erelzi), a biosimilar form of etanercept (Enbrel), to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis as well as plaque psoriasis. Earlier this year, infliximab-dyyb (Inflectra), a biosimilar version of infliximab (Remicade), became the first FDA-approved biosimilar for inflammatory types of arthritis in the U.S.
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Cupping Arthritis Michael Phelps

Cupping Marks Are the New Black (and Blue)

It took millennia, but cupping is finally having its grandstand moment. At the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, swimmer Michael Phelps, winner of 23 gold medals, sported dark circular bruises across his back and shoulders, visible to all. Other Olympic athletes in Rio also had signs of cupping, and celebrities including Gwyneth Paltrow and Jennifer Aniston have been photographed with cupping bruises.
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Akylosing Spodylitis Treatment

Drug Combination May Slow Ankylosing Spondylitis in Some Cases

For people with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) – a type of inflammatory arthritis that primarily affects the pelvis and spine – a pair of recent studies is shedding light on the possible benefits of a combination treatment with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor (a type of biologic drug).

In AS, chronic inflammation in the sacroiliac joints (in the pelvis) and in the joints and ligaments along the spine creates pain and stiffness. During the early stages of the disease, joint damage may not be apparent in X-rays. (In these cases, the condition is called nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA). As the disease progresses – and not all cases progress from nr-axSpA to AS – more joint damage occurs as the body grows new bone in an attempt to heal itself, which results in vertebrae fusing together. This reduces mobility and flexibility, and can lead to a hunched posture.
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metal on metal hip implant failure

Failure Risks of Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

Bone loss and subsequent implant failure are well known complications of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implants. Researchers now think they know why. In an article published recently in the journal Biomaterials, German investigators say metal debris from the implants may affect the body’s ability to form new bone.

A metal-on-metal hip implant consists of a ball and cup made of a cobalt and chromium alloy. Originally developed as a more durable alternative to implants with ceramic or polyethylene (plastic) components, MoM implants proved to be the opposite. In general, they have a much higher failure rate than implants made of other materials – a problem attributed mainly (but not solely) to bone erosion in the hip joint, which leads to the artificial joint loosening and the need for revision surgery.
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Akylosing Spodylitis Treatment

FDA Approves First Biosimilar for Arthritis

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Inflectra – a so-called biosimilar version of the biologic Remicade (infliximab) – to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) as well as psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. It is the first biosimilar approved in the U.S. for autoimmune, inflammatory conditions, including RA, PsA and AS, and only the second biosimilar approved by the agency to date. (A drug used in cancer treatment, filgrastim-sndz, sold as Zarxio, was approved in March 2015.)
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