Category Archives: Treatment

Dr. Martin Kriegel - Arthritis Research

Researchers on the Path to a Cure – Spotlight on Dr. Martin Kriegel

Trillions of bacteria live in or on your body. There are actually as many bacteria in your body as cells in your body. Fortunately, for most of us, most bacteria that live within us are helpful, not harmful. We call these bacteria commensal bacteria. Dr. Martin Kriegel and his team have been studying these bacteria, and more specifically, a protein that humans and bacteria produce, called Ro60, that plays a role in the development of lupus.

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Arthritis Biosimilar

FDA Approves Second Remicade biosimilar

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Renflexis (infliximab-abda), a biosimilar to Remicade (infliximab), making it the fourth biosimilar approved to treat inflammatory types of arthritis.

Renflexis is the second approved biosimilar to Remicade. The first one, Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb), was approved in April 2016. This is the first time the FDA has approved two biosimilars for one original, “reference” medication.
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Dr. Rae Yeung Arthritis Research

Researchers on the Path to a Cure – Spotlight on Dr. Rae Yeung

Dr. Rae Yeung believes in collaboration and building networks to solve problems. Her current 3-year Arthritis Foundation-funded project, “Precision Decisions to STOP JIA”, is an example of that. The goal is to develop a tool that will predict treatment response to specific drugs. Dr. Yeung’s study focuses on a group of high-risk children with polyarthritis, one of the most severe forms of childhood arthritis that affects many joints and is difficult to treat.
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Arthritis Research Dr. Bruce Cronstein

Researchers on the Path to a Cure – Spotlight on Dr. Bruce Cronstein

This story started with a dozen male research mice survivors from hurricane Sandy in 2012. The storm devastated Dr. Bruce Cronstein’s research lab, but born from the destruction was Dr. Cronstein’s 5-year Arthritis Foundation Investigator-funded project, “The Role of Adenosine Receptors in Osteoarthritis.”

He described the damage: “Our labs were closed for nearly a year and a half. We lost a lot of our animal facilities. However, once a lot of the debris was cleared, we were able to go in and found that some of our mice had survived.”
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Dr Farshid Guilak Arthritis Vaccine

Arthritis Foundation Investigator Developing Arthritis Vaccine

In February, we reported on Dr. Farshid Guilak’s current Arthritis Foundation-funded trailblazing project, “Engineering New Biologic Therapies for Arthritis.”

Dr. Guilak’s work is published in the journal Stem Cell Reports. The paper, entitled “Genome engineering of stem cells for autonomously regulated, closed-loop delivery of biologic drugs,” describes the research team’s method of engineering (reprogramming) stem cells to become “smart stem cells” that will sense inflammation and deliver biologic drugs where they are most needed. The smart stem cells-biologic drug combination is then injected into an arthritic joint.
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Hydroxychloroquine Eye Risk

Wrong Hydroxychloroquine Dose Is Common, Putting Eyes at Risk

Up to half of patients treated with the arthritis drug hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) are prescribed more than the recommended maximum amount, according to new research. In separate studies, Canadian and U.S. researchers found that 30 to 50 percent of patients didn’t receive the dose outlined in treatment guidelines; a smaller percentage didn’t get recommended eye exams.
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National Walking Day

Enjoy the Health Benefits of Exercise on National Walking Day!

Today is National Walking Day! Spring is finally here, and we can shed a few layers and lace up our walking shoes to celebrate the day! It may seem counterintuitive, but most people with arthritis find that physical exercise is an excellent way to ease pain, soothe achy joints and increase energy levels – just check with your doctor first to discuss your arthritis type and individual needs.
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Arthritis Biosimilar

FDA OKs First in a New Generation of Knee Cartilage Repair

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved a new product to repair damaged knee cartilage using cells from the patient’s own knee. The product, called Matrix Associated Chondrocyte Implantation (MACI), is approved for use in people younger than age 55 who have what are known as “focal chondral defects,” which can be a precursor to knee osteoarthritis (OA). Experts say, while MACI is not for use in people with knee OA, it does provide a new treatment option to prevent OA from developing in a particular group of patients.
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Arthritis Research Dr Lefebvre

Researchers on the Path to a Cure – Spotlight on Dr. Veronique Lefebvre

What do skin and cartilage have in common? It depends on who you ask. Dr. Veronique Lefebvre, a researcher at Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, is currently working on a 2016 foundation-funded project called “Quality-by-Design approach to create articular cartilage from pluripotency” that connects the dots between skin and cartilage. Dr. Lefebvre and her team are developing a protocol that starts with skin cells and ends with knee cartilage.
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Ankylosing Spondylitis Side Effects Risk Factors

Women and Long-Standing Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients at Risk for Other Conditions

Women who have ankylosing spondylitis and men and women who have had the disease longer have an increased risk of developing potentially debilitating symptoms beyond the joints, according to a new study presented at the American College of Rheumatology’s Annual Meeting.
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