Tag Archives: arthritis nutrition

Fresh Vs. Frozen Fruit

Anti-inflammatory Fruits and Veggies — Fresh, Canned or Frozen?

There’s nothing quite like eating a handful of freshly picked blueberries on a warm summer day, each bite bursting with flavor and inflammation-fighting polyphenols, bone-building minerals and must-have vitamins. Surprisingly, you can get nearly the same nutrition from a bag of frozen blueberries.

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arthritis health tips

Doctor-Recommended Arthritis Health Tips

We asked rheumatologists what they most wish their patients would do to improve their arthritis health. Here’s what they said.

  1. Be more open with your doctor.

In pain? More tired than usual? Tell your doctor. “Many individuals with arthritis feel that they’re ‘complaining’ or taking up too much of their doctor’s time. But more information helps a physician tailor treatment, leading to better health outcomes,” says M. Elaine Husni, MD, director of the Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Treatment Center at the Cleveland Clinic.

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healthy habits arthritis

10 Healthy Habits For Better Arthritis Management

In a perfect world, pain wouldn’t exist, our weight would be optimal and we’d enjoy daily exercise and have energy to spare. But as arthritis pain and stiffness invade joints, the desire to exercise and the energy for much of anything can wane.

The world is not perfect, but there are ways to manage weight, minimize pain and improve energy levels. By changing habits, anyone can make small changes that will have a big impact over time.

Not sure where to start? We asked experts to help compile this top 10 list of habits to adopt.

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Fish Oil for Arthritis

The Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Arthritis

You’ve probably heard of omega-3 fatty acids, especially if you have an inflammatory type of arthritis. They help reduce inflammation throughout the body, and some studies have shown benefits for heart health, brain function and diabetes.

There are two major types of omega-3 fatty acids in our diets. One type is alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and the other type is eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The body partially converts ALA to EPA and DHA.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), fish oil (EPA and DHA) is the most commonly used dietary supplement in the United States. A study published in the Annals of Rheumatic Disease in 2013, found that when a high-dose fish oil supplement is added to so-called triple therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (methotrexate, sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine), patients achieved better outcomes: they were far less likely to “fail” treatment and twice as likely to reach remission than those who did not take a supplement.

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