Tag Archives: arthritis diet

Affordable foods Arthritis

Your Arthritis Diet on a Budget

You’ve heard about the great foods you can add to your arthritis diet. But what if you’re on a budget? Here are some smart food swaps that are easy on your wallet.

Tea. Home-brewed tea is a good source of catechins, a type of antioxidant that benefits the heart by helping blood vessels relax. That’s especially helpful for people with rheumatoid arthritis, who are at increased risk of heart disease. Bottled teas don’t have catechins, which degrade in a few days. Drink home-brewed instead.

Savings: About 50 cents per 8-ounce serving.

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shopping tips for frozen food

Arthritis Diet Power Shopping: Frozen Foods

While the frozen foods aisle can be a trap – so many highly processed items with large amounts of fat and sodium, from pizza to breaded chicken strips – healthy choices can be found. The good news is that many frozen fruits and vegetables – without sauces and syrups – have all the nutrition of their fresh counterparts; sometime more so because they are packaged as soon they are harvested. Plus, they’re convenient (no worries about spoiling) and available year-round.

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gluten-free grain arthritis

Gluten-free Grains for Your Arthritis Diet

Those with  or even a mild sensitivity to gluten– a protein naturally found in wheat, barley and rye – may need to be creative when it comes to cooking and baking from scratch. Gluten can cause an inflammatory response in the body and may worsen arthritis symptoms if you have a sensitivity. Make sure to talk to your doctor if you think you have an allergy before eliminating gluten. Here are five lesser-known grains for standard flour that you can try.

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Breakfast Shopping Tips for Arthritis

Arthritis Diet Power Shopping: Breakfast Foods, Coffee Tea

It’s often said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Research has shown that breakfast skippers tend to overeat at other meals and snack excessively throughout the day. That can make it hard to maintain a healthy weight as you manage your arthritis.

But what you eat for breakfast is important. Hot and cold cereals are good options. They are quick ways to get a serving of fiber-full whole grains that can help reduce inflammation. While oatmeal may be your go-to grain, there are several nutritious cereals made from corn, brown rice, quinoa, hemp, buckwheat and kamut. Keep in mind that whole grain choices are not calorie-free and portion control is important.

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Foods for arthritis

Add Color to Your Arthritis Diet

Vibrantly colored fruits and vegetables contain high levels of phytonutrients – which lend plants a rich hue and protect your health by reducing susceptibility to disease. For optimal nutrition, combine them in one meal. “The more colors you eat at once, the more powerful the phytonutrients are, because of the synergy that happens,” says Steven Pratt, MD, a California-based nutrition expert and author of Super Health: 10 Simple Steps, 6 Easy Weeks, 1 Longer, Healthier Life.

Many of these brightly colored fruits boast anti-inflammatory properties which make them a great addition to your arthritis diet. So splurge on color at the produce department and reap the benefits of different types of phytonutrients.

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Arthritis Diet Plans

Which Arthritis Diet Plan Should You Try?

Keeping excess pounds at bay and eating the right foods are critical to keeping joint pain in check. But not all weight-loss plans are effective and not every diet is a good choice for someone with arthritis. We asked three dietitians for the skinny on five headline-grabbing plans.

PALEO
This plan recommends eating like a “caveman,” so anything that could be hunted or gathered is fair game. Anything else is on the chopping block.

Pros: The paleo diet prohibits processed foods while pushing nuts, seeds, fruits and veggies. Meats are free-range and grass-fed, and fish are wild.

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arthritis-friendly salad

5 Ways to Build an Arthritis-friendly Salad

Crafting an arthritis-friendly diet? Not all salads are created equal. What starts as a healthy foundation of vegetables often winds up suffocated in condiments and high-fat toppings.

Be picky about what you put on your salad, says Barbara Rolls, PhD, professor and Guthrie chair in nutritional sciences at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. “When you cut down on calorie-dense ingredients, you can ultimately eat more salad,” she says.

Build a healthier salad with these tips:

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Arthritis-Friendly Foods

Add These Arthritis-friendly Foods to Your Diet

Want to eat right for your arthritis? Limit sugar, processed foods and saturated fat (the kind in red meat and butter). Get plenty of fruits, vegetables and lean protein (like fish, nuts, seeds and beans). And try adding more of these three arthritis-friendly foods to your diet. Each has anti-inflammatory properties, which may help squelch pain.

Sardines

Think beyond salmon if you want to reel in the anti-inflammatory benefits of omega-3 fatty acids. A 3-ounce serving of canned sardines contains about 1.4 grams of omega-3 fats and is a good source of vitamin D, which helps our bodies absorb calcium to build and maintain strong bones. To save calories, look for sardines packed in water instead of oil.

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