Tag Archives: arthritis diet

Arthritis Friendly Freezer Meals

Arthritis-Friendly Freezer Meals

When you are tired and achy from your arthritis, a hot, nutritious meal at the end of the day may be just what you need – but preparing it can create even more pain and exhaustion.

Instead of toiling to prepare a meal full of anti-inflammatory foods every night, registered dietitian Sara Haas, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, recommends making meals in bulk and freezing them. At the end of a long day, all you have to do is reheat and serve.

Freezing meals, Haas says, “Is a great way to get balanced, more healthful meals in the comfort of your home.”
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Onions Anti-Inflammatory

Onions Can Help Prevent Inflammation

Onions aren’t just flavoring to your favorite dishes. They are low in calories, have virtually no fat and are loaded with healthful components that fight inflammation in arthritis and related conditions.

Onions are also one of the richest sources of flavonoids – antioxidants that mop up free radicals in your body’s cells before they have a chance to cause harm. One flavonoid found in onions, called quercetin, has been shown to inhibit inflammation-causing leukotrienes, prostaglandins and histamines in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), reduce heart disease risk by lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol and help prevent the progression of cancer.
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Health Benefits of Flaxseed

Anti-Inflammatory Benefits of Flaxseed

Step aside, salmon. Scoot over kale. Make room for flaxseed, a rightful member of the healthiest foods club. It has even been shown to ease arthritis, especially in rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and Raynaud’s phenomenon.

“Although flaxseed has been used for a long time – Hippocrates ate and wrote about it in 500 B.C. – it’s only been in the past 10 years that researchers have focused on flaxseed’s health benefits,” says Jocelyn Mathern, a registered dietitian and member of the Flax Lignan Information Bureau Advisory Board, a consumer education organization in Minneapolis.
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Summer Fruits & Vegetables Arthritis Diet

Summer Fruits and Veggies to Relieve Inflammation

Summer warmth can bring relief to achy joints, and so might summer fruits and vegetables. Indulge in the flavors of the season with these fresh picks, all packed with healthful, inflammation-fighting nutrients.

Strawberries

Strawberries contain anthocyanins, which help keep inflammation at bay, says registered dietitian Desiree Nielsen. Plus, strawberries are rich in vitamin C, which has been linked with building collagen and connective tissue.
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Health Benefits of Berries

The Health Benefits of Berries

You may know that berries are full of health benefits. Sure, they are loaded with fiber, which helps you feel full (and eat less). But did you know berries are good for easing your arthritis symptoms, too? Berries top the charts in antioxidant power, protecting your body against inflammation and free radicals, molecules that can damage cells and organs. Studies in aging animals even show that mixed berries improve cognition and motor performance.

James Joseph, PhD, director of the Neuroscience Lab at the United States Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, which conducted the studies, notes that people become more susceptible to the damaging effects of free radicals and inflammation as they age. Berries help prevent those effects by turning off the inflammation signals triggered by cytokines and COX-2s, he says, making them an ideal part of your diet.
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turmeric arthritis inflammation pain

6 Food Choices to Help Ease Arthritis Pain

For many years, people have claimed that certain foods in their diet reduced pain and joint inflammation from arthritis. Researchers continue to investigate whether foods and spices actually may play a role in relieving joint pain and, if so, how they work.

“Mostly it’s just healthy eating, with a lot of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds,” says registered dietitian Ruth Frechman, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
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smart diet tips arthritis

11 Smart Eating Tips for Arthritis

Wouldn’t it be great if you could just snap your fingers and know you’d never gain weight as you grow older? Unfortunately, it’s not going to happen. Exercise, cutting calories and smart eating are mandatory if you want to sail through your later years without putting on extra pounds.

The good news is, unless you are obese or have health issues, you don’t necessarily have to embark on special diets to keep extra weight at bay. All you have to do is choose your foods wisely. Ideally, you should make smart eating decisions before you put anything in your mouth.

Follow these recommendations from Larry Tucker, PhD, an obesity researcher and professor in the department of exercise sciences at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. They will help you avoid the numerous temptations we all face every day, from the birthday cake at the office party to Sunday brunch with the in-laws.
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Apples Anti-Inflammatory Diet

Research Shows Apples Can Cut Cholesterol and Inflammation

Whoever first said “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” was onto something. Research suggests that eating some apple on a daily basis might lower levels of cholesterol as well as C-reactive protein (CRP), a key marker of inflammation in the blood.

In a 2012 study of 160 women ages 45 to 65, half of the participants ate three-quarters of a cup of dried apples every day for a year, and the other half ate a cup of prunes – each 240 calories. Within six months, the apple eaters’ LDL (bad) cholesterol decreased 23 percent, their HDL (good) cholesterol increased 4 percent and their CRP fell 32 percent.

“Lower CRP is better for people with many inflammatory-related diseases, such as [rheumatoid arthritis] and atherosclerosis,” says study author Bahram H. Arjmandi, PhD, chair of Florida State University’s department of nutrition, food and exercise science in Tallahassee.
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