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Meditation Options for Arthritis Pain

Easy Meditation Options for Pain

Researchers agree – meditation can help with a host of health problems. “Relaxing and quieting your mind by focusing on your breathing can reduce stress – even the stress that comes with arthritis flares,” says David E. Yocum, MD, director of the Arizona Arthritis Center in Tucson. His studies, as well as others, found that patients who meditated responded to stress with lower heart rates and improved immune function; and that meditation, in combination with traditional medicines, appears to help patients with chronic pain. Studies have shown that meditation inhibits or relieves pain perception. And in a study published in the American Academy of Pain Medicine’s scientific journal in April 2015, 43 patients who used a mindfulness meditation program as part of their pain management experienced lower general anxiety and depression, better mental quality of life (psychological well-being), a greater feeling of control of the pain, and higher pain acceptance.
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Heat for Joint Pain Relief

Bring on the Heat for Joint Pain Relief

If your joints start to ache after a long day, try warming them up instead of popping a pill. Heat relaxes the muscles around painful joints and increases blood circulation, which can help you feel better fast. When a hot bath or shower isn’t convenient, try one of these options.

Electric Heating Pad

How It Works: Plug it in, wrap in cloth, apply for 20 minutes.

Best For: “They’re one of the best ways to heat a large body part – a hip, back, shoulder, knee – especially before activities like stretching,” says Doreen M. Stiskal, PhD, department of physical therapy chair at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey.

Pros: They’re easy to use and store; heat up quickly.

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Meditation for Arthritis Pain

Meditation for Arthritis Pain? A Beginner’s Guide

Meditation includes many different practices of focused thinking and relaxation and studies show it can help people with arthritis. No matter what technique you choose, the goal is to improve coping strategies for pain and reduce symptoms like stress and anxiety. Maybe you’ve even tried it – but two minutes felt like two hours and after each 20-minute session, the result was the same: You created a mental to-do list and had a sore behind. You’re not alone.

“We are so used to multitasking that we find it difficult to sit down and turn off our thoughts,” explains Scott Zashin, MD, a rheumatologist and clinical assistant professor of internal medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas. “Meditation is not a quick fix; it takes time.”

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Massage for Osteoarthritis & Fibromyalgia

Hands On: Massage Helps Keep Laurie Active with her Grandchildren

Laurie stays active with massage therapyDiagnosed with fibromyalgia in her 30s and then osteoarthritis (OA) in her 50s, pain has been a pretty consistent factor in Laurie Steiner’s adult life. But, as an active grandmother and frequent caretaker of seven grandchildren, Laurie doesn’t have the time to let the pain keep her down.

“I have a busy life, like most women,” says Laurie. “I watch several of my grandkids, which involves a lot of lifting, as well as getting down and dirty with them when we play together. I may have fibromyalgia and arthritis, but I can’t let it keep me from the things I love.”

In treating her pain, Laurie has been diligent in avoiding certain pain medications in fear that they will make her too tired to make it through the day.

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Antioxidant-loaded Veggies Help Fight Inflammation

If you’re looking for inflammation-fighting foods to bolster your health and help your arthritis symptoms, hit the produce section of the grocery store.

“Vegetables have the most potent antioxidants and more nutrients than any other food,” says Mladen Golubic, MD, PhD, medical director of the Center for Lifestyle Medicine at The Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic.

“Each antioxidant works slightly differently but they all work in synergy to give you the best bang for your buck,” says registered dietitian Lona Sandon, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. “Eating a variety of vegetables will assure that you’re getting some of everything.”

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arthritis and bad breath

Arthritis and Bad Breath

Do you have less than minty-fresh breath? Bad breath (or halitosis) can be a sign of health problems such as gum disease or dry mouth – two conditions that affect people with arthritis. The dry mouth could be caused by having Sjogren’s syndrome or from taking common over-the-counter medicines for arthritis pain, such as aspirin, ibuprofen or naproxen.

“Halitosis is very common – and fortunately, very curable,” says Connie White, DDS, general dentist and spokesperson for the Academy of General Dentistry.

Use these smart solutions to keep bad breath at bay:

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Arthritis-Friendly Foods

Add These Arthritis-friendly Foods to Your Diet

Want to eat right for your arthritis? Limit sugar, processed foods and saturated fat (the kind in red meat and butter). Get plenty of fruits, vegetables and lean protein (like fish, nuts, seeds and beans). And try adding more of these three arthritis-friendly foods to your diet. Each has anti-inflammatory properties, which may help squelch pain.

Sardines

Think beyond salmon if you want to reel in the anti-inflammatory benefits of omega-3 fatty acids. A 3-ounce serving of canned sardines contains about 1.4 grams of omega-3 fats and is a good source of vitamin D, which helps our bodies absorb calcium to build and maintain strong bones. To save calories, look for sardines packed in water instead of oil.

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