All posts by Arthritis Foundation

joint replacement cardiovascular side effects

Joint Replacement May Help Your Heart

Replacing damaged joints gives people with arthritis a dramatically improved quality of life – with reduction or even elimination of pain and improved mobility. A new joint can give you a new lease on life, allowing you to resume activities you love and improve your mood and relationships. But like anything in life, there are risks and benefits. A group of studies about the effects of joint replacement on your heart demonstrate those risks and benefits.

Studies published in recent years,  suggested that certain people are at increased risk of heart trouble following joint surgery. For example, a study in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases in 2011 found an increased risk for cardiac complications following joint replacement surgery in older patients and in those who had pre-existing heart disease, deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. And a 2012 study published in Archives of Internal Medicine found that hip and knee replacement surgery boosts the risk of heart attack  during the first two weeks after surgery, particularly in patients older than 60.

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impact exercise arthritis

Impact Exercises Could Possibly Help Arthritis

When it hurts to get out of a chair, running and jumping are probably the last things you would consider doing. In fact, these high-impact movements are often considered risky for arthritic joints; they apply a jolt of force that may lead to pain. But recent research reveals that some impact in some cases may actually be good for joints.

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gum inflammation

Surprising Triggers of Inflammation

Reining in runaway inflammation is essential for managing arthritis, especially autoimmune, inflammatory varieties such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis. Taking your medications as prescribed is essential, but certain lifestyle changes may lower inflammation, too. For instance, smoking sparks inflammation, says rheumatologist Susan Goodman, MD, of the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, so the choice is simple: Don’t. These other inflammation triggers may be less obvious.

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road trip tips arthritis

Road Trip Tips for Arthritis

The stress and tension that often come with road trips can add to physical discomfort and even lead to an arthritis flare. But with proper planning and a few travel tips, you can reduce surprises and anxiety, says Elin Schold Davis, an occupational therapist and coordinator of the Older Driver Initiative for the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) in Bethesda, Md. Here’s how.

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lupus rheumatoid arthritis blood clots

Arthritis Patients Face Increased Risk of Blood Clots

People with autoimmune disease such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are more likely to get dangerous blood clots during hospital stays. In fact, one 2014 Arthritis Research & Therapy meta-analysis of 25 studies found that people with inflammatory rheumatic diseases were three times more likely to experience venous thromboembolisms (VTEs, or blood clots in the veins) than the general population.

Lupus patients are four times more likely than people without an autoimmune disease to develop blood clots when hospitalized. And RA patients are one-and-a-half times more likely to develop blood clots during a hospital stay. According to a 2011 study from researchers in the United Kingdom, anyone with an immune-related disorder faces some sort of increased risk.

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organic fruits vegetables

Going Organic?

If you’re bypassing organic fruits and vegetables because of their higher prices, you may wonder if you’re shortchanging your health to save money. Even if non-organic produce isn’t doing you any harm, could organic be healthier?

In terms of nutrient quality, a scientific review of 162 studies published in 2009 in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found no significant differences between organic and conventionally grown produce.

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